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Depeschen mit dem Leitwort Movie

»Perhaps his dark side helps explain why The Friedkin Connection includes a picture of the demon Pazuzu — and why Pazuzu is a major player in what Mr. Friedkin calls “the film for which I’ll probably be remembered.”«

Janet Maslin

From Crashes to Exorcism: Janet Maslin about the memoir The Friedkin Connection by director William Friedkin. Why Mr. Friedkin saw monsters and wore jockstraps – find out at Maslin’s review at The New York Times.

»Film Freak is Fowler’s brisk, chatty memoir about his early days trying to get into the business, after a youth spent devouring all the all-night film screenings London used to offer. He’s upfront about calling it “a mirror-maze of mercifully forgotten entertainments”, rather than a rose-tinted walk down memory lane, and yet the book’s true appeal, whether he admits it or not, hinges on the curious nostalgia value of trash.«

Tim Robey

Tim Robey grabs the popcorn and settles into an entertaining, behind-the-scenes account of film culture in the Seventies. He reviews Film Freak by Christopher Fowler, best known as the author of the Bryant & May detective novels. Read more at The Telegraph.

»I’ve always loved genre movies, but Parker is the first one I’ve directed.«

Taylor Hackford

Film director Taylor Hackford about his film adaption of Parker, the literary creation of Donald E. Westlake. His article you will find at Los Angeles Times.

»SPOILER ALERT! The movie Psycho, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, does not have a happy ending. The movie Hitchcock, directed by Sasha Gervasi — the story, purportedly, of the making of Psycho— does.«

Jerome Christensen

Jerome Christensen about the new movie Hitchcock, directed by Sasha Gervasi. His review at Los Angeles Review of Books.

»Auf dem aktuellen deutschen Krimimarkt spielt Ross Macdonalds zu den Großleistungen der Kriminalliteratur zählendes Werk nicht einmal mehr eine Nebenrolle. Das kann wohl nur noch Hollywood ändern.«
Thomas Klingenmaier berichtet bei stuttgarter-zeitung.de über die geplante Verfilmung des Roman The Galton Case von Ross Macdonald sowie über eine Fernsehserie, die den Arbeitstitel Lew Archer führt.

»Which brings us to the dilemma of Holmes in a postliterate age, and the larger question of how one adapts literature for the movies, for an audience that has never read the original.«
Nicholas Meyer about the adaption of Sherlock Holmes into movies. His essay at lareviewofbooks.org.

»A film under production will chronicle a killing near Columbia University that was a fulcrum for the iconoclastic writers who became the Beats.«
David J. Krajicek reports about the crime in 1944 and the production of the film Kill Your Darlings. Read his story at nytimes.com.