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»For years, Alvin Dewey insisted that In Cold Blood was factual, and the humble lawman’s stamp of approval was evinced, by those who were inclined to believe the book, as a badge of its accuracy. He had furnished Capote with the access and materials to tell the true parts of his story, and had permitted the author to stretch the truth, in making, of Dewey, a hero. He was, in this subtle sense, a co-conspirator.«

Patrick Radden Keefe

Patrick Radden Keefe about Truman Capote‘s In Cold Blood and question about the image of Alvin Dewey, the lead detective in this case. Read the essay at The New Yorker.

Read also: Capote Classic ‘In Cold Blood’ Tainted by Long-Lost Files. By Kevin Helliker. At The Wall Street Journal.

»Looked at in this way, it isn’t hard to see why In Cold Blood so completely shattered Capote: in Perry Smith, and his check-kiting partner in crime Richard Hickock, Capote was encountering his nightmare image of himself, what he could become if he ever lost his chameleon-like talent.«

Michael Bourne

‘God, Let Me Be Loved’: The Tragedy of Truman Capote. A portrait by Michael Bourne at The Millions.

»Questions about the accuracy of In Cold Blood, the seminal 1966 “nonfiction novel” by Truman Capote, are nothing new. (…) Two recent developments, however, shed a particularly troubling light on Capote’s account of the 1959 murders of four members of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kan. «

Laura Miller

New evidence suggests Truman Capote‘s In Cold Blood covers up an investigator’s goof that might have let the murderers kill again. Laura Miller reports at Salon.

»In Cold Blood is remembered less for being a great book than it is for the ethical issues raised by Capote’s relationship with the two killers Richard Hickock and Perry Smith and the tragedy which befall Capote due to the books phenomenal success.

My advice – read Compulsion, it’s a better book.«

Steve Powell

Author and editor Steve Powell (100 American Crime Writers) about the non-fiction novel Compulsion by Meyer Levin. His view at The Venetian Vase.