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Depeschen mit dem Leitwort Charles Manson

»The nearer Guinn’s biography draws to its central horror, the more it picks up speed. The middle section pitches us into the whirlpool, presenting a swirl of horrific gore and bubbling black comedy.«

Xan Brooks

Manson thought he was bigger than the Beatles, but in reality he was little more than a career criminal and pimp. Xan Brooks about the new biography Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson by Jeff Guinn. His review at The Guardian.

»Though most of the literate world knows what’s to come, Guinn ably maintains suspense. Even if Manson is occasionally tedious, recounting over and over the Family’s peripatetic adventures — garbage diving for food, stealing, “creepy-crawling” into people’s homes at night — it stands as a definitive work: important for students of criminology, human behavior, popular culture, music, psychopathology and sociopathology, and compulsively readable for anyone who relishes nonfiction.«

Ann Rule

How did a juvenile delinquent named Charles Manson become the notorious killer whose crimes still horrify us today? Ann Rule about the new biography Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson by Jeff Guinn. Her review at The New York Times.

»Guinn, who has written books about Bonnie and Clyde and the Gunfight at the OK Corral, writes in a brisk, dispassionate, ›just the facts, ma’am‹ style that makes his account all the more compelling. He studiously avoids any mythologising of the ›Manson as the embodiment of evil‹ variety.«

Mick Brown

During the Summer of Love, Charles Manson and his followers were high on drugs and listening to the Beatles. They were also planning a killing spree, says Mick Brown. His review of the biography Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson by Jeff Guinn you can read at The Telegraph.