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The 100 best novels: 'The Maltese Falcon'
»Raymond Chandler, who owes so much to Hammett, deserves the last word. He said of The Maltese Falcon: «If you can show me 20 books written approximately 20 years back that have as much guts and life now, I’ll eat them between slices of Edmund Wilson’s head.» Nearly 100 years later, the «guts and life» of Hammett’s prose still puts some of his etiolated heirs to shame.«
— Robert McCrum

The 100 best novels: Robert McCrum selected The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett on the list of 100 best novels. Read his justification at theguardian.com.

  • Walt by Russell Wangersky
  • Last of the Independents by Sam Wiebe
  • Visions by Kelley Armstrong

Crime fiction from Canada: Sarah Weinman about new books by Russell Wangersky, Sam Wiebe and Kelley Armstrong. Read her reviews at her column Crimewave at nationalpost.com.

  • Darkness, Darkness by John Harvey
  • Rose Gold by Walter Mosley
  • The Stone Wife by Peter Lovesey
  • Prison Noir edited by Joyce Carol Oates

Letting Go: Marilyn Stasio about new novels by John Harvey, Walter Mosley and Peter Lovesey and about the Akashic anthology Prison Noir edited by Joyce Carol Oates. Her reviews at The New York Times.

Edgars 2014: Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

The Mystery Writers of America is proud to announce the winners of the 2014 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2013. The Edgar® Awards were presented to the winners at our 68th Gala Banquet, May 1, 2014 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, New York City.

  • BEST NOVEL: Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger
  • BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR: Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews
  • BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL: The Wicked Girls by Alex Marwood
  • BEST FACT CRIME: The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War by Daniel Stashower
  • BEST CRITICAL/BIOGRAPHICAL: America is Elsewhere: The Noir Tradition in the Age of Consumer Culture by Erik Dussere
  • BEST SHORT STORY: The Caxton Private Lending Library & Book Depository in Bibliomysteries by John Connolly
  • BEST JUVENILE: One Came Home by Amy Timberlake
  • BEST YOUNG ADULT: Ketchup Clouds by Annabel Pitcher
  • BEST TELEVISION EPISODE TELEPLAY: Episode 1 – The Fall Teleplay by Allan Cubitt
  • ROBERT L. FISH MEMORIAL AWARD: The Wentworth Letter in Criminal Element’s Malfeasance Occasional by Jeff Soloway
  • GRAND MASTER: Robert Crais and Carolyn Hart
  • RAVEN AWARDS: Aunt Agatha’s Bookstore, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • THE SIMON & SCHUSTER MARY HIGGINS CLARK AWARD (Presented at MWA’s Agents & Editors Party): Cover of Snow by Jenny Milchman

Here you will find the Nominees for the 2014 Edgar Allan Poe Awards

Congratulations to all winners!

»Child 44 was one of those rare books that managed to thrill both the Booker judges and the Richard and Judy brigade. The Farm is, perhaps, even better. It is so good, in fact, that you will finish it quickly and then be jealous of anyone who hasn’t read it yet.«

Simmy Richman

A sort of therapy session: Simmy Richman about the novel The Farm by Tom Rob Smith. His review you can read at The Independent.

»Call Mr. Pavone a reliable new must-read in the world of thrillers, but don’t call him an optimist. He sees book publishing going down the tubes even faster than the moral quandaries of early-20th-century American fiction have.«

Janet Maslin

A page-turner with a dirty secret: Janet Maslin about the latest novel The Accident by Chris Pavone. Her review at The New York Times.

»Le Carré first disclosed that Bingham was the inspiration for Smiley in 1999. Bingham had also written crime novels, and when one was reissued, Le Carré wrote in the introduction: «He had been one of two men who had gone into the making of George Smiley. Nobody who knew John and the work he was doing could have missed the description of Smiley in my first novel.»«

Jasper Copping, Ben Farmer and Hayley Dixon

Novelist John le Carré hits out at accusations that his portrayal of the world of espionage had »hurt« his former mentor in the intelligence services, on whom he partly based his most celebrated character, George Smiley. Jasper Copping, Ben Farmer and Hayley Dixon report at The Telegraph.

»We live in an impermanent world. This story is the opposite of that. If one’s lucky enough to find in this life somebody who makes sense of the world for you, who is the perfect fit emotionally, spiritually, psychologically, that is something we respond to quite warmly.«

Alexander McCall Smith

No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency author Alexander McCall Smith talks about his characters and his spin on a Jane Austen classic. The interview by Carole Burns you will find at The Washington Post.

»Love Story, with Murders is a dark delight, and I look forward to Fiona’s future struggles with criminals, her demons and the mysteries of her past.«

Patrick Anderson

Variously wry, unexpected and perverse: Patrick Anderson about the novel Love Story, with Murders by Harry Bingham. His review at The Washington Post.